Submit a news tip



Return to PopoloCrois: A Story of Seasons Fairytale likely to have dual audio

Posted on October 27, 2015 by (@NE_Brian) in 3DS, 3DS eShop, News

Return to PopoloCrois: A Story of Seasons Fairytale will likely feature dual audio, according to XSEED localization specialist Thomas Lipschultz. Players should able to choose either English or Japanese voices in the game. The news should be made final once all of the official business has been finalized.

Actually, PopoloCrois will feature three options once the paperwork is all settled. Selecting the English track is possible, but there are also two Japanese language versions that feature different actors for Pietro and Narcia.

As explained by Lipschultz:

“Currently we’re shooting for dual audio. It’s in the game already, but we don’t have all the final signatures and paperwork in yet, so we can’t officially say yes — but it’s 90% right now. I’ve been joking that it’s actually “trual” audio, since there are actually two Japanese language tracks. They’re exactly the same for most characters, but for Pietro and Narcia, they recorded two separate tracks, with two actors for each character. They went with a more classic-styled, 90’s era track for one of them, and a modern anime moé style for the other. So you get to pick which type of Japanese voice you’d prefer: something a little more in line with the classic feel of the game, or something a little more modern – or you get to choose English! Assuming we have the Japanese options in, of course, which it’s looking like we will.”

Lipschultz also commented on the English track:

“The English track is based off of the more classic style, and I think it turned out great. We can’t reveal the actors’ names or anything, but there’s a character who joins your party, the Blue Wolf, and we actually got a pretty big-name actress to bark and growl and howl for the part! It was just a fantastic process in general, and a lot of fun, and I think the voices turned out great – I’m really looking forward to hearing what people think of them when they hear them in context.”

Source

Leave a Reply