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System: Switch
Release date: October 16, 2019
Developer: Game Freak
Publisher: Game Freak


Little Town Hero is the most deceptive game I’ve ever reviewed. On the surface, it doesn’t look all that intimidating – this original RPG from Game Freak features a lighthearted story and cartoonish visuals, even claiming to be built with “the busy gamer in mind.” All that considered, it makes itself out to be a charming little experience. Yet beneath this welcoming veneer lies an extremely strategic combat system whose depth and complexity will likely prove overwhelming for all but the most seasoned roleplaying veterans. It’s vastly rewarding for those willing to dive deep into its dense mechanics, but for anyone looking for the lighter experience that the game makes itself out to be, then they might be let down.

System: Switch
Release date: October 15, 2019
Developer: CD Projekt Red / Saber Interactive
Publisher: CD Projekt Red


As I look at my Switch’s home-screen, I find myself questioning the reality of whatever timeline it is that I’ve ended up in. Super Mario Odyssey’s icon is nestled neatly between that of Star Wars Jedi Knight II: Jedi Outcast and The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt, and I can’t quite figure out if I’m dreaming or if I’m just overtired. Existential nightmare aside, I’ve been tasked with reviewing The Witcher 3 on Switch, and despite having had months to adjust to the game’s presence on Nintendo’s hybrid, I still can’t quite wrap my head around the idea of it being real. Not only is it actually real, but it’s the full package too – the base game in its entirety along with every scrap of DLC – all present and accounted for, and all on a single 32GB cartridge. I have two questions: How? Followed closely by: How good?

Hello, my spookies and cuties! This week on NEP, we have a special guest: Jonas Kaerlev of Gears For Breakfast, creators of A Hat In Time. Oni Dino and Galen chat with him about love for 3D platformers, game design philosophies, and a ton of underrated gems spanning across genres in gaming. In particular Jonas shares how they used their own branch of Unreal 3 on Switch, the necessity of trying new things in game development, and how they overcame Switch’s limitations and created an amazing experience without any big compromises.

We then cover Doom Eternal’s delay news and all the new details we’ve yet to discuss with Luigi’s Mansion 3. Gooigi is still gross. Partner mechanic should’ve been Daisy. We stand by that.

If you’re enjoying NEP, please consider giving us a 5 star review on Apple Podcasts, aka new iTunes. It’s incredibly helpful in getting us exposed to new listeners through algorithms, so we would greatly appreciate your help. Thank you for listening!

Super Smash Bros. Ultimate still has a long life ahead of it. Just went some may have thought that DLC for the game could be coming to an end, it was revealed during last month’s Nintendo Direct that even more characters are on the way.

Thus far, Super Smash Bros. Ultimate players have been able to get their hands on Joker, Hero, and Banjo-Kazooie through DLC. We also know that Fatal Fury fighter Terry Bogard has been confirmed. That means the Smash Bros. Fighter Pass has one more character left, and then an unspecified amount of roster additions will follow.

Let’s think about Super Smash Bros. Ultimate’s future for a second. Are there any characters in particular you’d like to see join? The possibilities are still endless. If you have any thoughts to share, let us know in the comments below.

Hello, my major and minor league gym leaders! This week on NEP, we’re going over all the new Pokemon details—including the controversies… We also break down the AlphaDream bankruptcy story, and Oni Dino has dug through some Japanese language reports and is bringing that straight to your ears. We also muse on our ideas for Nintendo skins for Overwatch characters, thanks to some lovely listener mail.

If you’re enjoying NEP, please consider giving us a 5 star review on Apple Podcasts, aka new iTunes. It’s incredibly helpful in getting us exposed to new listeners through algorithms, so we would greatly appreciate your help. Thank you for listening!

A new month rolled right on in earlier this week. Now that we’re in October, we want to know what you’ve been playing.

Have you been playing any of the new Switch releases as of late such as Dragon Quest XI S, Zelda: Link’s Awakening, Daemon X Machina, or Astral Chain? Going through something in your backlog? No matter the case, let us know in the comments below.

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Those that have played The Alliance Alive feel that its a standout RPG on 3DS. However, the game came out pretty late in the system’s life cycle, and may have been overlooked. It’s now getting a second shot in the public eye as FuRyu teamed up with NIS America to bring The Alliance Alive HD Remastered to Switch.

At the Tokyo Game Show, we were treated to a big interview with several developers involved with the new version. We asked about why The Alliance Alive is returning, what’s new this time around, and more.

Here’s our full discussion:

System: Switch
Release date: September 26, 2019
Developer: THQ Nordic
Publisher: THQ Nordic


Earlier this year, THQ Nordic treated us to a rather lovely Switch port of Darksiders – titled Darksiders Warmastered Edition – that proved, if nothing else, to be a bit of a technical achievement. Being a fast-paced hack and slasher that relies on precise inputs and visual cues, it gave Switch owners the choice of either playing the game at high resolution and 30 frames per second, or at a lower resolution whilst running at 60 frames per second. This choice, and the work that went into making it possible, resulted in a technically magnificent game that drew plenty of praise across the Switch community. As we near the all-important holiday season, THQ Nordic has decided to bolster its late 2019 lineup with a Switch port of the game’s sequel, Darksiders II Deathinitive Edition.

System: Switch
Release date: September 24, 2019
Developer: Konami
Publisher: Konami


Contra: Rogue Corps is a fever dream. It’s an unexpected revival of a long-dormant franchise in a new genre, one in which an cybernetic panda can tear through an alien horde while a shirtless soldier declares that “You know I had to do it to ’em” as he rides a rocket into said crowd of fiends. On top of this absurdity, it is also one of the blandest, ugliest, and most disappointing games I’ve yet had the pleasure of reviewing. But how did Rogue Corps go so wrong? Let’s review aggressively and find out.

System: Switch
Release date: October 1, 2019
Developer: Rebellion
Publisher: Rebellion


If you were lucky enough to first became acquainted with gaming during any decade earlier than the one we’re in now, then you’ll surely be familiar with a breed of game that has faded in prominence over recent years – “AA” or “Double-A” games. As budgets for both development and marketing have skyrocketed throughout the industry, little space has been left for plucky upstarts to cut their teeth alongside the EAs and Activisions of the world, no more so than when it comes to shooters. Developers often have to scale their projects and studios back, or submit to becoming a cog in the bigger machine through acquisitions and buyouts just to remain in operation. That hasn’t been the case for the rather aptly named Rebellion though, and their seemingly-ever-present tactical World War 2 shooter Sniper Elite. Over four main entries and a handful of spinoffs, Sniper Elite has managed to garner something of a cult following for itself, solidifying its position in the dwindling “AA” space – so much so that Rebellion has seen fit to bring not one, but two Sniper Elite games to the Switch this year. We now find ourselves treated to an “Ultimate Edition” of the third game in the series, but just how “Ultimate” it can be considered is ultimately up for debate.