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CD Projekt Red

If someone would have told you a couple of years ago that The Witcher 3 would eventually be on Switch, there’s a good chance that you may not have believed them. Before the game was announced, many people thought that such a port would be simply impossible. Yet Saber Interactive managed to make it work, bringing the entire experience to Nintendo’s console and on a single game cartridge to boot.

During NVIDIA’s GPU Technology Conference, Saber Interactive’s Roman Lebedev delivered a presentation all about the Switch version of The Witcher 3. Lebedev went into detail regarding CPU, memory and build size optimizations and tradeoffs made during development.

Below are some of the highlights:

With The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt having been updated to version 3.6, it brings along cloud saves with the PC version and new graphics settings as highlights. Footage of the patch can be found below.

The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt’s new 3.6 update is out now on Switch worldwide, CD Projekt has announced.

As previously mentioned, the patch adds support for save file integration with Steam and GOG. There’s also new graphical options, support for touch controls, and more.

Below are the full update details:

There have been mixed reports as to whether The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt would be updated on Switch. Saber Interactive, one of the studio’s involved with the port, had apparently said on a VK social media page that a patch was coming and it would be “worth the wait.” However, that comment was deleted, leading fans to wonder what was actually happening.

Making matters more confusing, we’re hearing that an update has in fact started to roll out. Players in Korea are allegedly able to download version 3.6, though we can’t confirm that it’s live in any other region currently.

CD Projekt Red has again commented on the possibility of Cyberpunk 2077 coming to Switch.

Speaking with OnMSFT, the studio’s John Mamais confirmed there aren’t any active plans to port the game currently. He also acknowledged that that kind of project “might be too heavy for it,” but given what we saw with The Witcher 3 on Switch, it’s not something that can be ruled out entirely.

Mamais’ full words:

Earlier today, Thronebreaker: The Witcher Tales saw a surprise release on the Switch eShop. Take a look at some footage below.

Earlier today, we reported on the surprise launch of Thronebreaker: The Witcher Tales on the Switch eShop today. Nintendo has now followed up this news with a launch trailer for the game:

Thronebreaker: The Witcher Tales is out now on the Switch eShop, listed at $19.99. This is a standalone single-player component for Gwent: The Witcher Card Game that was originally introduced in The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt.

Check out an overview of the game here:

Thronebreaker is a single player role-playing game set in the world of The Witcher that combines narrative-driven exploration with unique puzzles and card battle mechanics.

Crafted by the developers responsible for some of the most iconic moments in The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt, the game spins a truly regal tale of Meve, a war-veteran and queen of two Northern Realms—Lyria and Rivia. Facing an imminent Nilfgaardian invasion, Meve is forced to once again enter the warpath and set out on a dark journey of destruction and revenge.

 

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Thronebreaker: The Witcher Tales may have a chance of coming to Switch. Over in South Korea, the game is listed for Nintendo’s console in a CSV file from November.

CD Projekt Red originally released Thronebreaker: The Witcher Tales last year. The RPG is “set in the world of The Witcher that combines narrative-driven exploration with unique puzzles and card battle mechanics.”

Here’s an overview of the game, along with a trailer:

Original developer CD Projekt Red was involved in bringing The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt to Switch. However, Saber Interactive handled a great deal of the technical work. In an interview with GamesBeat, chief executive officer Matthew Karch discussed the porting project in detail.

Karch mentioned that The Witcher 3 was initially “running at 10 frames per second, was taking 50% more memory than the Switch has, and the build size was 20GB larger than the biggest Switch cartridge.” Saber therefore turned off dynamic shadowed lights, removed screen-space ambient occlusion, and lowered the number of NPCs in the world by 30 percent.

That last change didn’t go over well, as Karch explained: