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In a recent interview with Japanese publication Famitsu, Bravely Default II producer Masashi Takahashi commented on how the coronavirus pandemic impacted Bravely Default II’s development. Voice recording for foreign releases of the game had to be handled entirely remotely, and voice actors recorded from their homes while receiving coaching and guidance remotely. Takahashi also shared how the Japanese studios were impacted by the pandemic and why the team ultimately decided to delay the game.

Takahashi went on to say that the team needed extra time “in order to seriously address the opinions of fans who played the demo and produce something the development team was satisfied with”.

Nintendo Everything’s translation of the interview excerpts between Famitsu and Takahashi can be found below.

Among Us wasn’t always the breakout game fans know of today. In an interview shared by Nintendo, Innersloth co-founder Forest Willard discussed the title’s origins.

Among Us went through quite a few changes during development. Willard said that players “would draw a role card and roam around a house aimlessly while ‘the mafia’ person secretly ‘killed’ players by drawing a finger across someone’s neck. The tasks also “changed several times” and the ship was initially “always in crisis while the crewmates attempted to hold it together and Impostors could do tasks wrong to hinder players.”

The same interview also touched on how long it took to create Among Us. Since the game was “originally so much smaller,” the team wrapped up development in about seven months.

Here’s the full interview from Nintendo:

In a previous issue of Famitsu, the publication spoke with Monolith Soft president Hirohide Sugiura. One of the topics discussed was how Monolith Soft has grown in scale, and Sugiura’s vision for the future.

He shared the following with the Japanese magazine:

Update: After looking at Automaton Media piece again, we’ve verified that our translation is correct. However, the publication may have mixed up its transcript. The site should have written “GPU” instead of “CPU” for the line: “The CPU’s performance can be changed rather quickly by reducing the resolution and graphics settings, so CPU optimization is usually the priority.”


Last year, new collections from 2K made their way to Switch. BioShock: The Collection, XCOM 2 Collection, and Borderlands Legendary Collection ended up on the platform. 

Aside from Borderlands, Virtuos was responsible for everything else. And during an interview with Automaton Media, the studio’s Andy Fong and Lukas Codr shared interesting details about the Switch ports of the BioShock games and XCOM 2. The two spoke about the actual porting process, difficulties encountered along the way, and how long it took to complete development.

You can read our full translation below by Nintendo Everything’s Oni Dino.

Suikoden came to be thanks to the ideas from Yoshitaka Murayama. He acted as director, producer, and writer on the series’ initial releases, but he also worked on later entries as well. Murayama ended up leaving Konami around two decades ago, but he’s not opposed to revisiting the series.

Speaking with Nintendo Everything, Murayama mentioned that the new JRPG Eiyuden Chronicle is his current focus and the fact that he’s in complete control of the IP is certainly a plus. At the same time, he would be “more than happy to work on another Suikoden game if the chance presented itself in the future.”

Murayama’s full words:

In a previous interview with Automaton Media, key developers from Virtuos (Andy Fong and Lukas Codr) sat down to detail their porting process for Switch games. Keen readers might recognize the studio’s name from the likes of Dark Souls: Remastered, BioShock: The Collection, XCOM 2 Collection, and more.

During the interview, Virtuos confirmed that the studio has a dedicated team to work on Switch projects. The developers also spoke about developing for TV / handheld modes and where the company’s strengths lie when it comes to handling Switch ports.

Check below the break for the full translation of the excerpt by Nintendo Everything’s Oni Dino.

Nintendo hasn’t done much with the F-Zero series in well over a decade. F-Zero GX, one of the series’ last major entries, came out way back in 2003 for the GameCube.

Toshihiro Nagoshi is known for the Yakuza series these days, but fans may remember that he held an important role on F-Zero GX. Nagoshi was actually a producer on the game all of those years ago. It seems as though he still has fond memories of the project, as he’d be open to revisiting the series.

As is tradition for Famitsu, the magazine spoke with a ton of different developers about their ambitions for 2021. One developer who participated was Keisuke Kekuchi, who’s leading the Gust brand at Koei Tecmo and is also the producer of Fatal Frame.

Kekuchi shared the following with Famitsu, as translated by Nintendo Everything:

Former Nintendo of America president Reggie Fils-Aime has revealed that an opportunity once came about to work with rapper, record producer, fashion designer, and entrepreneur Kanye West on a video game. However, it was something that never came to be in the end.

During E3 many years ago, Kanye West visited Nintendo’s area, and was even able to spend a bit of time with Shigeru Miyamoto. Later on, he wanted to arrange for a meeting with Reggie as well. Despite the craziness happening with E3, the two ended up getting together at Kanye’s business office for his fashion business in Calibasas.

Reggie recounted the experience in which he said:

Game Informer has released a new video with IO Interactive director Mattias Engström. The publication asked Engström 79 rapid-fire questions, detailing what fans should expect from the upcoming title.

Here’s the full video:

Hitman 3 – Cloud Version will be made available on Switch in the future.