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Eternal Darkness

Nintendo and Silicon Knights’ GameCube title Eternal Darkness went through an interesting development cycle. It was originally planned for the N64, but ended up shifting to the GameCube. Silicon Knights was actually targeting release for the system’s launch, but that didn’t happen.

According to director Denis Dyack, Eternal Darkness would have been ready for the release of the GameCube. But after the 9/11 tragedy took place, some aspects had to be rewritten. Dyack visited Nintendo in Japan, spoke with Satoru Iwata and Shigeru Miyamoto, and had to ensure that any potential controversial aspects were changed or removed.

Dyack said the following in the latest episode of the IGN Unfiltered show:

For many years, dedicated fans have hoped that Eternal Darkness would return. Nintendo published the GameCube game back in 2002 after it was created by Silicon Knights, but the IP has been dormant since then. Despite Nintendo playing around with the trademark a few times, there have been no new developments.

Interestingly, Silicon Knights did have interest in the IP before the studio closed. According to director Denis Dyack, the company was “in the process of getting the rights back, but it never completed.”

Denis Dyack, the director of the Nintendo-published psychological horror game Eternal Darkness, appeared on the latest episode of IGN Unfiltered. Dyack reflected on the GameCube title during a lengthy segment of the show.

Dyack discussed Nintendo’s interest in Silicon Knights after seeing the studio’s camera tech, moving the project from the N64 to the GameCube, working with Nintendo, and more. One interesting story came about when he was asked if any Sanity Effects were cut from the final game. Everything made it in, but not without some effort. Dyack actually spoke directly with Nintendo’s Shigeru Miyamoto about the one memorable Sanity Effect in which Eternal Darkness would make it seem as though your save file was being deleted.

On Tuesday, Nintendo filed a new trademark application for Eternal Darkness in the United States. It was then officially published yesterday.

This actually isn’t the first time we’ve seen a trademark pertaining to Eternal Darkness. The filing we heard about a few years ago is still in place, though only until the end of the year. When that happens, Nintendo will need to provide a Statement of Use if the company doesn’t want the application will be abandoned. There are also slight differences between the new and old Eternal Darkness trademarks.

You never quite know what you’ll get with these trademarks. This one had a 1B filing, meaning it’s an application based on intent to use. That doesn’t mean Eternal Darkness is getting a sequel though. Nintendo could be looking to protect the name, or could be interested in something like a Virtual Console release.

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Earlier this week, Nintendo updated the trademarks for Eternal Darkness and the Wii Vitality Sensor in the United States. Both were updated on December 17. There’s some talk about both products seeing some sort of development, but I’m not quite willing to go that far… yet.

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