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Believe it or not, interviews with Metroid Prime: Federation Force producer Kensuke Tanabe are still popping up. USgamer published its piece today. In this interview, Tanabe addressed topics pertaining to amiibo, the initial backlash, timeline, story, and even Retro Studios.

We’ve rounded up a number of excerpts below. For the full interview, head on over here.

With Metroid Prime: Federation Force, Nintendo wants “to expand the Metroid universe.” That’s according to producer Kensuke Tanabe, who also explained to Eurogamer that his desire to create a co-operative experience meant that Samus needed to take a back seat. This is because having players control different versions of the character wouldn’t make sense.

Tanabe also commented on how load-outs work on Federation Force and again talked about Federation Force’s plot.

Here’s a roundup of some of what was shared by Tanabe:

“[Metroid Prime: Federation Force] is an attempt to expand the Metroid universe. As you can play with up to four players it wouldn’t make sense to play as four Samus characters! The game will be focused on co-op, working together as a team with up to four players. And obviously it is available as a single-player experience as well.”

“You have the option to choose load-outs for you to bring to the battle. However, you have to consider that there will be limitation for how much can carry as a character. If you carry the Super Missile then you’re classed as a Warrior type. If you have lots of Repair Capsules you could focus on being a Healer type.”

“I’ve always been thinking about having a battle between the Galactic Federation and Space Pirates. The Metroid Prime series fits between Metroid 2 and Super Metroid, as you may be aware. So it falls under that same timeline, but looking at it from a different perspective.”

“It’s set on a planet which the Galactic Federation used, way back when. The plot involves a struggle to retake that planet. You find out that Space Pirates now reside there and are building a weapon to use against the Federation. Players will fight the Space Pirates to stop them.”

Source

Speaking with Mashable, Nintendo of America Reggie Fils-Aime acknowledged the negative reactions that Metroid Prime: Federation Force has been receiving thus far. However, he was quick to point out that those who went hands-on with the game at E3 2015 have “come across really pleased.” Reggie ultimately asked fans for their trust.

“We’re taking our great IP and transforming them and making them new again — making them fresh and appealing for the fan who feels they know the franchise. But we’re giving them new things to enjoy. What the fan at home saw was something in the Metroid Prime universe that they weren’t expecting. The reaction has been negative. There’s no sugar coating it. This is an example where fans who aren’t able to get their hands on the game may be at a bit of a competitive disadvantage. Everyone who has played what we are showing regarding Metroid Prime, they’ve come across really pleased. My ask is that fans trust us.

Reggie also spoke about the need for Nintendo “to keep the franchises fresh.” This is what Zelda producer Eiji Aonuma has set out to do with Zelda, and it’s what the company believes is necessary “in order to propel the franchises forward”.

Mr. Aonuma has said that he is challenging many of the conventional wisdoms of Zelda gaming in this new Zelda, and that’s what we do. We believe we have to do that to keep the franchises fresh. We believe that in order to propel the franchises forward, we have to be the ones to constantly challenge the paradigms, challenge the conventional wisdom, challenge what we thought was the essence of the particular franchise, and a particular form of gameplay.”

Source

Wired is the latest outlet to have published an article with commentary from Nintendo producer Kensuke Tanabe. Tanabe discussed Metroid Prime: Federation Force in-depth, including how it’s more than just a shooter, bits about the story (and how it’s important to Prime’s overall plot), how it’s players’ “first chance to actually see Samus in-game”, and more. He also again touched on wanting to continue the Prime series after the ending of the third game.

Read on below to read up on what Tanabe said. You can also find Wired’s full article here.

Last September, Unseen64 pulled back the curtain on Next Level Games’ cancelled Wii project “Super Mario Spikers”. The site’s Liam Robertson has now given the project another look in a new video, which you can view below.


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