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GoldenEye 007

MEL Magazine has a huge article up looking back on GoldenEye 007. Lead environment artist Karl Hilton, gameplay / engine programmer Mark Edmonds, and developer David Doak were brought in for the retrospective piece.

The interview has a number of highlights, some of which we have below. There’s talk about toning down the violence with Nintendo being concerned about the amount of killing, how using Oddjob is cheating in their view, and huge success including Nintendo being unable to keep up with the initial demand.

Often during a game’s creation, developers have to scrap various elements. It could be due to a lack of time, or a completely different reason.

In the case of GoldenEye 007, Rare originally intended to have four different Bonds included. Sean Connery, Roger Moore, Timothy Dalton, and Pierce Brosnan would have all been playable in the end. Unfortunately, this was left on the cutting room floor, though some elements were left behind in the original code and files.

Though the game had released many years ago, the online servers for GoldenEye 007 have still been up and running on Wii. At least in Japan, they’ll be going offline on March 30. The news hasn’t been confirmed for other territories as of yet, but other regions could certainly be impacted as well.

You might be wondering how the online play for GoldenEye 007 could still be running after the end of Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection a few years ago. While most games for Wii and DS were affected, a few were not – including this title.

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Ken Lobb might not be a name everyone is familiar with, but he had a major impact on Nintendo back in the day. As a former executive at Nintendo of America, he influenced both software and hardware.

The N64 megahit GoldenEye 007 was one game Lobb was involved with. In a lengthy interview with Game Informer this month, Lobb discussed the game in-depth starting with its origins up through release.

GoldenEye 007 started out with “a tiny team at Rare,” Lobb said. Speaking about why this happened, he explained:

“Let’s just say, the ‘bigs,’ or the more experienced Rare developers were busy. They also weren’t super thrilled about making a game with a license. The license had come from Japan, from Mr. [Hiroshi] Yamauchi. He started the negotiations for it. Tim and Chris had agreed to take on the project. But the people making Donkey Kong, Banjo, Killer Instinct – they’re all busy. So, Martin Hollis and a little group of people began working on it.

They worked in barns at the time. Rare was called the Manor Farmhouse. It was this beautiful old farmhouse with a bunch of developers in it, and all these barns that were converted into development spaces. One was for Banjo, one was Killer Instinct, the smallest one had Martin Hollis, David Doak, and the whole team behind GoldenEye. I was visiting Rare a lot, once every 8 to 10 weeks to work on Killer Instinct 2. Actually, the end of Killer Instinct and into Killer Instinct 2, while they were making GoldenEye. I developed a friendship with Martin. That had a couple, shall we say, interesting impacts…”

The folks over at Smosh have once again produced an “honest trailer” for a game. This time, the video focuses on GoldenEye 007. Check it out below.

While speaking at the GameCity festival in Nottingham, co-designer Martin Hollis opened up about the development of GoldenEye 007. A number of interesting tidbits were shared, including Shigeru Miyamoto’s interest in turning down the killing – including close-up killing.

If you’re interested in reading up on the full report from Hollis’s talk, head past the break. You can also check out The Guardian’s article here.

Actor Sean Bean portrayed James Bond’s nemesis Alec Trevelyan in the 1995 film GoldenEye. He also appeared in the video game GoldenEye 007 created by Rare.

One fan recently asked Bean in a Reddit AMA what it was like being in the classic title. He said in response:

Oh, it’s good, it’s great! Especially because it’s so popular, it’s like, quite unique really. It was such a big hit. But I think I’ve seen him. I think my head looks a bit square innit.

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