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Shigeru Miyamoto

Rare was originally developing Dinosaur Planet for the N64. However, the project was cancelled, and ultimately saw a complete transformation. The final game ended up as Star Fox Adventures for the GameCube.

Former Rare staffer Phil Tossell spoke about what the studio initially had in store for Dinosaur Planet while speaking with Retro Gamer this month. Tossell revealed that the project “was supposed to be a hybrid of Diddy Kong Racing and an adventure game.”

“Actually, it was supposed to be a hybrid of Diddy Kong Racing and an adventure game. Every level would have some kind of track in it and a race as part of the story. It took a while to settle down…”

One reason why Dinosaur Planet turned into a Star Fox title was because of Shigeru Miyamoto’s feeling that some of the characters between the two were similar in appearance. To say the least, Rare welcomed the opportunity to work on one of Nintendo’s legendary franchises.

“It seemed like a no-brainer. They’re offering this great character from this great franchise! I was attached to Dinosaur Planet but I love the original Star Fox. Our only concerns were how we could fit it into this game we have.”

Thanks to joclo for the tip.

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Shigeru Miyamoto is celebrating his 61st birthday today. Miyamoto, the creator of Mario, Zelda, and plenty of other Nintendo franchises, was born on November 16, 1952.

With that, Happy Birthday, Shigeru Miyamoto!

Eiji Aonuma has a special relationship with Shigeru Miyamoto. After all, the two have been working together for a couple of decades.

Aonuma shared some of his thoughts concerning Miyamoto in GamesTM’s previous issue. Surprisingly, Aonuma revealed, “The time I have spent working with him is even longer than my relationship with my father”. Aonuma also mentioned that he feels he’s “far away from reaching Mr. Miyamoto’s level of perspective” and hopes Miyamoto will “forever” continue providing opinions on Nintendo’s titles.

Michel Ancel may be the creator of Rayman, but he doesn’t consider himself to be on the same level as Shigeru Miyamoto.

Ancel spoke briefly about how he views himself in comparison to Miyamoto while speaking with ONM recently. Ancel feels he’s more of an “apprentice” whereas “Miyamoto is a master” – or perhaps an “advanced apprentice”.

He said:

“It’s very kind of you to have me with such talented people, but I really consider myself to be an apprentice, where Miyamoto is a master. Well, maybe an advanced apprentice!”

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Eurogamer has posted up some Super Mario 3D World interview session bits from Shigeru Miyamoto, producer Yoshiaki Koizumi, and director Kenta Motokura. The three commented on the game’s clear pipes, appealing to advanced players as well as beginners, and more. Head past the break for the full Q&A roundup.

Gamekult recently conducted an interview with Shigeru Miyamoto, Yoshiaki Koizumi, and Kenta Motokura. As you can tell by the title of this post, it’s filled with tons of interesting bits about Super Mario 3D World and Mario in general.

As far as 3D World is concerned, the three commented on the game’s engine, difficult, DLC (and a bunch of other things). General topics include the possibility of introducing a radical art style for Mario, working with an external studio, a more open Mario, and Miyamoto’s plan to work on smaller projects.

You can find the full interview roundup below (note: Google Translate used). You can also find Gamekult’s piece here.

Super Mario 3D World’s multiplayer looks like a bunch of fun. It’s great and all that you can play locally with three other friends, but wouldn’t it have been nice to tackle the game online with others as well?

Kotaku recently decided to ask Shigeru Miyamoto about the lack of online play in Super Mario 3D World, to which he said the functionality “simply wasn’t the focus for us this time around.” Miyamoto explained that Nintendo was interested in making “something that people could experience fully while playing comfortably with others who were nearby them”.

He said:

Even more interview quotes from the Super Mario 3D World team have appeared, this time from IGN. There are more comments from Shigeru Miyamoto, producer Yoshiaki Koizumi and co-director Kenta Motokura on the game’s design and name, cat suit, multiplayer, and new/old elements. Head past the break for the full roundup.

The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker HD proves remakes can go a long way on Wii U. So that begs the question: how about a Mario remake? Wouldn’t it be fantastic seeing something like Super Mario Sunshine updated in HD?

Shigeru Miyamoto is certainly open to the possibility. Nintendo’s own developers are concentrating “on new stuff”, but he says HD releases could “be a good project for a development partner of ours, so that’s something I hope we have the opportunity to introduce in the future.”

Miyamoto told GamesRadar:

As for remaking previous games in HD, that’s certainly possible, but currently most of our devs are working on new stuff, and we like to have them working on new stuff. HD remakes might, however, be a good project for a development partner of ours, so that’s something I hope we have the opportunity to introduce in the future.

But the main thing that’s always going to be on our minds are, “What new elements of gameplay can we use with the GamePad as applied to some of these older games?” We want to find some way to bring a new experience to this than simply update the visuals and leave it at that.

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Shigeru Miyamoto has previously spoken about Nintendo’s desire to lessen the gap between 2D and 3D Mario players. This is something he reiterated during a recent media session.

He said:

“The joy of a 3D Mario game for me is really that you’re able to move freely in any direction and use lots of different fun actions while exploring a world. The joy of a 2D Mario game for me is that anyone can play these games and have a good time, even if it’s their first time playing a game. There’s a certain kind of simplicity to the concept of simply proceeding in one direction and reaching the goal.”

“The first time I think that we brought all of these disparate elements from these two different series together was in Super Mario 3D Land. But in the case of Super Mario 3D World, I think that we’ve found a way to evolve further in incorporating all of these elements, or have reached another goal, if you will.”

“Now that’s not to say that we may not make more games in the vein of Super Mario Galaxy in the future. I’d certainly like to consider that possibility. But our goal right now is to expose as many people as possible to this type of gameplay in a 3D world. And I think what we’ve come up with here is the most balanced system in which to do this.”