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A new month rolled right on in yesterday. Now that we’re in February, we want to know what you’ve been playing.

Have you started up something entirely new for the month? Trying out the Switch port of New Super Mario Bros. U? No matter the case, let us know in the comments below.

Last week’s issue of Famitsu had a different type of Super Smash Bros. Ultimate interview. While we’re typically used to hearing from director Masahiro Sakurai, the magazine caught up with two people heavily involved with the music side of things. Hideki Sakamoto (who wrote the main theme song) and Erina Koga (who sung the main theme in Japanese) chatted with Famitsu. There was talk about the creation of the music, what the recording session was like, and more. 

You can read our full translation of the interview below. We do also have a brief comment from Sakurai as well who commented on his approach to the main theme this time around.

After a week off, Masahiro Sakurai published his latest column in Famitsu this week. His piece was again dedicated entirely to Super Smash Bros. Ultimate, and this one was particularly interesting.

Sakurai managed to receive permission from Nintendo in sharing some data about online play in Smash Bros. Ultimate. His column was only in reference to a specific week, but he went over victory rates, character usage, and more. 

Here’s our full translation:

What up, kids and squids?!

This week on NEP, Oni and Galen get a little loopy… The big news, of course, is Metroid Prime 4’s development changes. HOWEVER! Instead of freaking out like everyone else on the internet right now, you get genuine discussion and thought! Skip the clickbait and check us out for facts, rumor skepticism, and discussion on how this could impact Nintendo’s 2019.

In addition, we talk about tons of news from this past week, especially Furukawa’s comments and Oni’s secret thoughts while he was translating. Galen then does some investigation on Shiver Studios, who are making Mortal Kombat 11 for Switch. And finally, we get into some deep, deep Mario lore that’s been hidden away in an old issue of the magazine, Famicom Tsushin! (link to the image below)

We had a blast this episode, and we really hope you’re enjoying listening! Please leave us your feedback, and do check below for more details and timestamps! Thanks for listening!

In this month’s issue of Nintendo Dream, a lengthy interview was published with Masahiro Sakurai. The magazine has several pages touching on a wide variety of topics with the Super Smash Bros. Ultimate director. Sakurai weighed in on the lack of certain playable characters like representatives from Xenoblade Chronicles 2 and ARMS, explained why Incineroar was chosen over Decidueye, spoke about Piranha Plant, talked about specific character changes such as giving Ganondorf a sword, online play, and more.

We’ve prepared a complete translate of Sakurai’s interview with Nintendo Dream. You can read it in full below.

What up, kids and squids?!

This week on NEP, Oni and Galen go off the rails and discuss everything Nintendo under the sun. Plus, Oni’s a little bit nicer to Galen this week. At least, he thinks so.

A ton of news and talking points came up this week – that and Oni’s jetlag made for a great recipe for wacky thoughts and meandering topics for discussion. Furukawa’s comments on Nintendo’s future, SNES on Switch, NoR president shenanigans, and Persona’s future on Nintendo consoles all get talked about, among other things.
Plus, Oni’s kindness breaks under the pressure as he engages in “Kombat” with Galen over OPINIONS on VIDEO GAMES.

We hope you enjoy! Let us know what you want to hear from us! Check out below for topic details and timestamps!

Last week, we posted a translation of a column from Sonic the Hedgehog series sound designer Tomoya Ohtani in which he spoke about working on some Splatoon music from Super Smash Bros. Ultimate. Sonic Team sound director Jun Senoue had his own contribution having worked on a new Mega Man 4 medley.

Why did Senoue go with Mega Man for his music piece? He discussed that and more in his own column, which we now have a translation of as well. You can read it in full below.

“I think if you play “Phantasy Star” after reading this interview, you’ll look at the game in a whole new light.”

-Naoki Horii, M2 Dev Team

Japanese website Game Watch recently sat down for an interview with three key figures from SEGA and M2 handling the SEGA AGES collection on Nintendo Switch.

The mega interview contains all kinds of details on new features to the Switch version, the incredible headaches that 80’s game development caused them, and never-before-heard stories from development of the original “Phantasy Star”, firsthand from Rieko Kodama, who was the original designer for the game. It’s a must-read for die-hard fans. And if that wasn’t enough, we’ve included some discussion about the SEGA Ages series in general that you may have missed last week (with some extra comments).

We’ve prepared an exclusive translation of the in-depth interview, and hope you enjoy.

Nintendo president Shuntaro Furukawa recently participated in an interview with Kyoto Shimbun, which was published just a few days ago. The company’s boss weighed in on selling 20 million Switch units by the end of the fiscal year and needing a steady stream of games for the system, mobile (including keeping smartphone games separate from Switch), and the future of 3DS. He also teased future plans for Labo, touched on eSports, and commented on looking towards the Chinese market.

Here’s a full translation of the interview:

Super Smash Bros. Ultimate director Masahiro Sakurai published a new column in this week’s issue of Famitsu. While there was some talk about the Switch game, Sakurai touched on a few other interesting topics as well.

In his piece, Sakurai started out by writing about a couple of games he’s been playing. He also discussed his own personal way of playing Smash Bros. Ultimate at the moment, and thanked fans for their support having sold 5 million copies in its first week. The piece also brings up creating entertainment, regrets, and the Japanese games industry.