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The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds

The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker HD and The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds both offer Hero modes. In the former title, it’s accessible right away. But in A Link Between Worlds, players must complete the game before tackling the more difficult mode.

Zelda producer Eiji Aonuma discussed why this is so while speaking with ONM. In the magazine’s latest issue, he explained that some gamers may have already played Wind Waker on GameCube, but since A Link Between Worlds is brand new, the team “felt that it was more suitable to have the players first enjoy the game at an appropriate difficulty level and then let them try a harder challenge.”

Aonuma’s comments in full:

ON THIS EPISODE: Jack re-fills us in with some love of Papers, Please, Laura causes a long and hearty discussion about Little Inferno, and Austin continues to berate A Link Between Worlds while praising Oracle of Ages.

PLUS: A lot of news about Nintendo’s future and their new “Quality of Life” business strategy— a discussion ensues.

AND: Plenty of listener mail about achievements, Nintendo’s future, and our favorite sequels rounds out the show.

This Week’s Podcast Crew: Austin, Jack, and Laura


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ON THIS EPISODE: Austin lambastes A Link Between Worlds further, Aysha (filling in for Laura) gives us her impressions of Orcs Must Die! and Outlast, and Jack sings the praises of Papers, Please and Super Paper Mario.

PLUS: Listener mail includes some criticism of achievements, lots of speculation about Nintendo’s future, and a fairly entertaining song about our podcast! Plus more.

AND: We try to play Settlers of Catan while doing the podcast for the first hour. It uh… didn’t work out so well.

This Week’s Podcast Crew: Austin, Jack, and Aysha (whaaaat!?)


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Famitsu recently caught up with a few members of The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds team to gain insight into the project’s development. Director Hiromasa Shikata, lead programmer Shiro Mouri, and lead designer Koji Takahashi spoke about a number of topics, including Link’s wall-merging ability.

Here’s a roundup of what was shared, courtesy of Siliconera’s translations:

Shikata on how Link’s ability to become a painting and part of a wall came to be…

“The thought of having link become a drawing on a flat surface seemed interesting to me; an idea that came out of nowhere. However, I thought that simply having him be part of a flat surface would’ve made it no different than a side-scrolling game, so we thought it would be better to have him turn along the corners of the walls, after further consulting with the [other members of staff].”

Zelda: A Link Between Worlds has a few references to Majora’s Mask. One of these, as many fans are aware, is the inclusion of the mask in Link’s house.

Game director Hiromasa Shikata told Game Informer this month that the reference “was a special request from Aonuma’s production team.” He also teased, “Now why would they ask us to do that?”

Source, Via

ON THIS EPISODE: Austin discusses the faults of The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds, Laura gives her first impressions of Chibi-Robo: Photo Finder and Little Inferno, and Jack fills us in on the wondrous adventures that await you in LIMBO.

PLUS: A long discussion about Nintendo’s financial situation, what it means, and what they could do about it. Jack comes up with a particularly interesting idea that would suit their situation very well.

AND: A massive dumping of listener mail keeps us busy for the final hours with topics from the design of Super Mario 3D World to what games are good to play if you’re in a bad mood.

This Week’s Podcast Crew: Austin, Jack, and Laura


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For The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds, Nintendo managed to implement silky smooth 60 frames per second. This begs the question: could future Zelda titles incorporate the same rate as well?

Well… no. Zelda: A Link Between Worlds director Hiromasa Shikata says 60 FPS isn’t necessarily a standard for additional entries in the series. In the case of the 3DS game, the team wanted to ensure a “smooth” look for the 3D visuals, “allow the players to clearly see enemy movements, and keep everything moving crisply as with previous games.” Having said that, “This doesn’t mean that all future Zelda titles will run at 60 frames per second.”

Shikata told Game Informer:

It’s really the concept of the game that changes whether you want to keep the volume of information in the game low and running at 60 frames per second. We kept it at 60 to make the 3D look smooth, allow the players to clearly see enemy movements, and keep everything moving crisply as with previous games. This doesn’t mean that all future Zelda titles will run at 60 frames per second.

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In its first week on the Japanese market, The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds sold roughly 224,000 copies. This resulted in an 83.47 percent sell-through rate for Nintendo.

A Link Between Worlds climbed to a total of 297,215 units by the end of its second week. The game’s shipment sell-through rate also rose to 96.84 percent.

While Zelda: A Link Between Worlds’ performance is down compared to Phantom Hourglass and Spirit Tracks, Nintendo has intelligently handled the game’s shipments. Spirit Tracks saw an initial shipment of 600,000 copies, but only ended up selling through half that amount for its release. Ocarina of Time, like A Link Between Worlds, was handled much better as the first shipment was slightly more than 182,000 copies, which created a 90.02 percent sell-through rate.

A Link Between Worlds will need steady sales in order to catch up to Phantom Hourglass, one of the best-selling portable Zeldas in recent times. Total sales for the DS title hit 900,000 units in less than two years. Ocarina of Time also sold rather well with sales hitting 560,000 copies by the end of 2012.

Source

ON THIS EPISODE: The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds dominates discussion throughout the episode, but we also hear a bit about FTL from Austin, Phoenix Wright: Dual Destinies from Laura, and Braid/Proteus/Counter Strike GO from Jack.

ALSO: Listener mail has us talking about the best way to spend eShop bucks.

AND: A discussion about the consequences of the new item system in A Link Between Worlds rounds out the ending.

This Week’s Podcast Crew: Austin, Jack, and Laura


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2013 is over and 2014 has officially started. Here’s a big jumbled mess of choices that our staff members had for their 2013 games of the year!

To make an argument against the thesis that 2013 was one of the all-time best years in gaming would be a foolhardy activity. The year saw the release of instant-classics like The Last of Us and Super Mario 3D World, as well as world-stoppers like Grand Theft Auto V and Pokémon X and YZelda made a big comeback on 3DS alongside Fire Emblem, and after years of no news we finally saw the release of Pikmin 3 on Wii U. An intro paragraph like this– no matter how densely packed– could never do justice the year we’ve had, so let’s let the staff of NintendoEverything do it instead.

After the break, you’ll hear from Brian (site admin and boss man), Austin (podcast man and writer guy), Jack (podcast man and writer guy), Spencer (writer guy), Patrick (writer guy) and Scott (video guy) about what they all found to be their absolute favorite games of 2013. Consider this list primarily subjective.

Brian’s Picks

Austin’s Picks

Patrick’s Picks

Jack’s Picks

Scott’s Picks

Spencer’s Picks

The Final List