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Developer Musings

As part of its E3 2015 plans, Nintendo launched [email protected] in June. This was a special one-week promotional period in which Wii U owners were given the opportunity to download and play demos from upcoming indie titles. For gamers who couldn’t make it to E3, it allowed them to experience some of the excitement of being at the expo.

We reached out to five developers who were involved with [email protected] to share some thoughts about participating in the program. Below you’ll find some musings from 13AM Games (Runbow), Brainseed Factory (Typoman), MixedBag Games (forma.8), Ripstone (Extreme Exorcism), and Wales Interactive (Soul Axiom). What was it like for these studios to participate in Nintendo’s newest eShop initiative? How was it getting the demos up in time for E3? How do they feel about the program as a whole? These were just some of the topics the developers we reached out to touched upon, and each team shared some very interesting insight about the process of being included in [email protected] Continue on below for their thoughts.

Nintendo’s entry into the mobile market through its partnership with DeNA is a natural fit, but moving forward it does beg a lot of questions. When you combine Nintendo’s notoriety for doing things their own way with the unforgiving nature of the mobile market outside of the already flooded free-to-play space, its not as simple as making a Mario endless runner and calling it a day. Nintendo has an interesting set of challenges put forward to them, as the kind of investment they make in this space could have some unprecedented consequences for their own handheld platform.

We reached out to developers Springloaded Software, Joost van Dongen, Rawkins Games, and Yazar Media Group for their take on the best way for Nintendo to get some of the mobile limelight and use it as a way to get more consumers back where they really want them – on their own systems. How can the two spaces co-exist without diminishing what’s already there with the 3DS? Is it possible for the mobile titles to exist as both good standalone products as well as a good entry point for Nintendo systems? Will Nintendo finally have to follow the trend rather than setting it when it comes to working on a platform that’s not their own? Having existed in both the traditional console and mobile spaces themselves, our guests this week offer some insight into some of the possibilities Nintendo has going forward.

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Nintendo has a notorious reputation when it comes to iterating their handhelds and in the past it has created an environment with a unique set of issues to consider for developers. Whether it was the Game Boy to Game Boy Color, DS Lite to DSi and now the 3DS to New 3DS, every generation there’s always questions among fans regarding the value and longevity of each new system. You don’t have to look very far to see how fans react to mid-cycle announcements like these, but how do developers react when a new system emerges from Iwata’s coat pocket?

We reached out to developers Stuart Ryall, Brjann Sigurgeirsson, and Ken Patterson to offer their thoughts on the announcement of the New 3DS and what implications it has on each of their development processes, if any. Will focusing on the extra processing power and C-stick split their player base too thin? Do these new units put too much pressure on fans to upgrade and consequently put pressure on developers to focus on the new units? How do these iterations impact the overall life of a console generation? Our guests this week help shed some light on the impact these mid-cycle hardware announcements have on developers, and what questions they have to ask when developing with these challenges in mind.

(Unsure as to what Developer Musings is about? Check out our first entry here for an explanation.)

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It’s been quite some time since Dan Adelman left Nintendo for greener pastures in the independent space (he “helps indies with the business stuff” now, according to his Twitter bio), but it does appear that he left something of a legacy behind with him through the games he helped release on WiiWare and the Nintendo eShops. World of Goo — perhaps the single most notable WiiWare game ever released — was released digitally almost entirely because of his appeals, and the recent release Shovel Knight came out as a Nintendo-focused game initially due to his support.

As sort of a tribute to these developers, this nice man, and the games that they, together, helped give us, we asked a few folks that Dan worked with over the years to talk about what he did and how he helped them get their games out. If you’ve ever wanted to know some of what goes on behind-the-scenes between platform holders and developers, there’s quite a bit worth reading down below.

(Unsure as to what Developer Musings is about? Check out our first entry here for an explanation.)

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I don’t think many people could pick a single “favorite” Nintendo game; most of us end up picking a top three or top five in a desperate attempt to include every game we’ve ever found truly special.

Here at Nintendo Everything, though, our interview subjects get no such privilege. We asked three developers– Black Forest Games, The Game Bakers, and Adam Rippon from Muteki Corporation and Choice Provisions– to provide for us two games: first, their favorite Nintendo-published game of all time. A tough task, no doubt, but on top of that? A second question! We also asked for their favorite non-Nintendo game on a Nintendo platform.

Could you pick just two? Check out the answers we got in below for inspiration– you might be surprised at some of the answers.

(Unsure as to what Developer Musings is about? Check out our first entry here for an explanation.)

Being a developer that works with Nintendo has, in the past, been considered something of a novelty for independent companies. Before WiiWare existed on Wii there wasn’t much of a way to get your game published on a Nintendo platform without a “proper” publisher, and even with Nintendo’s digital offerings on Wii and DSi things remained relatively closed off.

Now, with Wii U and 3DS, game development is open and independent developers have brought out masses of titles to the two platforms. But what’s it like to work with Nintendo? Is there any hint of their shielded past nowadays, or have things loosened up so much that such a past is indistinguishable?

“Willing to help” seems to be the common theme across all three of our entries in this week’s ‘Developer Musings’ series. Of course, there does seem to be some of that traditional red tape still involved– head past the break for comments from Dakko Dakko (Scram Kitty), Ludosity (Ittle Dew), and Nyamyam (Tengami).

(Unsure as to what Developer Musings is about? Check out our first entry here for an explanation.)

We’ve brought in three more developers for the next entry in our new feature series, “Developer Musings”. This week, we have a few words from RCMADIAX, Eden Industries, and Frozenbyte as they share some thoughts about the stress of making games. Head past the break for their comments.

Unsure as to what Developer Musings is about? Check out our first entry here for an explanation.

We’ve brought in three more developers for the next entry in our new feature series, “Developer Musings”. This week, we have a few words from Ripstone (Knytt Undergroud, Pure Chess), Image & Form (Steamworld series), and Two Tribes (Toki Tori 2, EDGE) as they share some thoughts about the eShops. Head past the break for their comments.

Unsure as to what Developer Musings is about? Check out our first entry here for an explanation.

We’ve brought in three more developers for the next entry in our new feature series, “Developer Musings”. This week, we have a few words from Gaijin Games, Neko Entertainment, and Goodbye Galaxy Games as they touch on how they deal with feedback from critics and players alike. Head past the break for their comments.

Unsure as to what Developer Musings is about? Check out our first entry here for an explanation.

Nintendo Everything is introducing a brand new feature known as “Developer Musings”. For each entry, a few different Nintendo developers (usually between 3-5) will share their thoughts about a particular topic, ranging from developer-specific ones (like our first topic below) to more “light” subjects (such as their favorite Nintendo games).

We’re kicking things off today with three prominent developers you should recognize if you’ve been keeping up with the indie scene: Renegade Kid’s Jools Watsham, Gunman Clive creator Bertil Hörberg, and Yacht Club Games’ Sean Velasco.

For our first topic, we asked these trio of prominent developers about making game trailers. How do they decide on what elements to include in these videos? Which areas of the game do they choose to focus on? How do they decide on which gameplay features to showcase? How do they determine the amount of gameplay to include? These are just some of the questions we sought to gain insight on.

Head past the break for some thoughts from Watsham, Hörberg, and Velasco about creating game trailers.