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The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time

Zelda series producer Eiji Aonuma wasn’t originally involved with the creation of Link’s Awakening. He was just a player at the time, but his time with that game would later influence the series in a big way.

Aonuma’s first major role with Zelda came about when he served as director on Ocarina of Time. Speaking in last month’s issue of EDGE, he revealed how Link’s Awakening ended up influencing the making of the N64 title, stating:

Twenty years ago, The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time launched on the N64. Many would say that it is among the most influential games in history.

Ocarina of Time has been praised since its original release for taking what was previously a 2D-only adventure series and perfectly making the transition to 3D. Nintendo also came up with significant mechanics that are still used today, including Z-targeting during combat. Nintendo’s classic remains one of the most highly-rated titles of all time.

Happy 20th anniversary to The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time!

A brand new Zelda: Ocarina of Time glitch is starting to circulate within the speedrunning community. With it, any item can be used as child or adult Link.

Exodus122, who found the glitch, suggests that the development could have a big effect on speedrunning. As one example, since you can now equip the hammer as a child, you can complete the fire temple as child Link. While it was possible before, the glitch greatly streamlines the process and removes complicated steps.

Here’s a look at the glitch in action:

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There’s no question that Ganondorf’s design in Ocarina of Time is extremely iconic. Ganon had appeared in previous titles in beast form, but the N64 game was Nintendo’s first attempt at giving him a humanoid form. Ganondorf’s look turned out well in the end fortunately, but it took some time to get there.

A couple of Nintendo artists spoke about creating Ganondorf’s design in the new Zelda: Art & Artifacts book. As the person in charge of enemies for Ocarina of Time, the job of making his model was left to Satoru Takizawa, who accomplished the task done after much trial and error.

Takizawa’s first attempt at Ganondorf resulted in a model that was actually “a lot thinner, and his head almost looked bird-like.” As for Yusuke Nakano, he came up with an illustration that had “wide-open eyes.” According to Takizawa, the art for Ganondorf “initially looked like a brute who had nothing but raw strength.”

Here’s the full discussion from Zelda: Art & Artifacts about Ganondorf’s design in Ocarina of Time:

Terry Garrett started playing The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time back in 2011. Five years later (with some breaks in between), he’s managed to finish the game.

Terry is actually blind, so it was no easy feat to complete the N64 classic. There’s plenty of trial and error involved as he’s only able to progress by listening to sounds signaling enemies, walls and the rest of the environment via two speakers.

Garrett thanked “all those who have stuck with me through this series even after it seemed like I was giving up.” Viewers shared walkthroughs, tips, and more that he could listen to in order to finish off Ocarina of Time.

If you’d like to see the entire journey, head on over to Garrett’s YouTube page here. We’ve also embedded the final video below.

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Update: Geoff Keighly has now stated that the performance won’t actually be at The Game Awards. Instead, it will only be released online.


It’s been announced that The Game Awards 2015 will feature a special performance from DJ Hardwell. During the show, he’ll have a remix from The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time. Gerudo Valley will be the main song featured.

Check out the announcement of DJ Hardwell’s Zelda remix for The Game Awards below.

Earlier this year, Runnerguy2489 completed the first three dungeons in The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time blindfolded. He’s since stepped his game up by finishing the entire game using the same method.

You can take a look at Runnerguy2489’s playthough of the ending below. To complete Ocarina of Time, he spent roughly 103 hours.

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The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time came to the Wii U Virtual Console a few days back. You can now watch some footage of the eShop release below.

The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time is launching on the North American Wii U eShop tomorrow, a listing on Nintendo’s website confirms. It will be available as a Virtual Console download for $9.99.

Here’s the official overview:

The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time – one of the most critically acclaimed games ever made –returns on the Nintendo eShop for Wii U. Set off on a legendary journey to stop Ganondorf, who has plunged Hyrule into darkness. Travel through time as child and adult Link and experience Hyrule in peace and war to save the world and protect the Triforce.

Your quest takes you through dense forests and across wind-whipped deserts. Swim raging rivers, climb treacherous mountains, dash on horseback across rolling hills, and delve into dungeons full of creatures that fight to the finish to put an end to your adventures. As Link, you’ll also travel through time to solve puzzles, save friends, and right Ganondorf’s wrongs with the help from your trusty Ocarina of Time and the mysterious youth, Sheik. The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time is one of Nintendo’s most epic challenges ever and one of its most touching stories, and is an absolute must-play for Nintendo fans.

Zelda: Ocarina of Time was confirmed as one of Europe’s Virtual Console releases for this week on Monday. Europe is getting Fire Emblem: Shadow Dragon and Advance Wars 2: Black Hole Rising tomorrow as well.

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Alright, this is pretty neat. Instructable put together a 15-step guide that shows fans how to create a bartop arcade cabinet for The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time, which you can find right here.

Plywood is used for the actual cabinet while the game is emulated with Rasberry Pi 2. There are a total of 11 buttons to mimic the N64 controller button layout.

Okay. Who’s going to build one of these things?

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