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We have more insights from the Mario Golf: Super Rush development team in which key developers discussed Battle Golf, Adventure Mode, new characters, and fashion.

Yesterday we posted the first half of the Nintendo Dream interview with some of the lead staff on Mario Golf: Super Rush, which covered the team’s approach to new entries in the franchise, opening cinematics in Mario sports games and much more. In the second half of the interview, the team goes on to talk about other aspects.

Here’s the rest of the translation:

A few developers behind Mario Golf: Super Rush have opened up about the game, including how the title came to be and the series’ history, the opening movie, Swing Mode, change in mechanics the franchise has seen previously, and more.

You may recall that we recently posted some excerpts from a Nintendo Dream interview conducted an interview with some of the lead staff involved with the development of Mario Golf: Super Rush. Camelot’s Hiroyuki Takahashi (Producer) and Shugo Takahashi (Director), along with Nintendo’s Shinya Saito (Producer) and Tomohiro Yamamura (Director) gave readers a peak behind the development curtain by talking through their experiences making the game.

Since the interview is quite lengthy, we’ve decided to split it up into two parts. Our translation of the first half can be read below.

Nintendo Dream recently conducted an interview with some of the lead staff involved with the development of Mario Golf: Super Rush and shared some interesting news. Camelot’s Hiroyuki Takahashi (producer) and Shugo Takahashi (director), along with Nintendo’s Shinya Saito (producer) and Tomohiro Yamamura (director) gave readers a peak behind the development curtain by talking through their experiences making the game.

We know that the final subtitle ended up being “Super Rush”, but another name was considered during development. Following the success of Mario Tennis Aces, it turns out that “Mario Golf Aces” was also considered as a potential name for Mario Golf: Super Rush, according to news shared with the Japanese magazine.

Below is our translation of their thoughts on why it was considered and how they ultimately landed on Super Rush:

Japanese magazine Nintendo Dream recently conducted an interview with some of the lead staff at Camelot involved with the development of Mario Golf: Super Rush.

At one point of the discussion, Hiroyuki Takahashi (producer) and Shugo Takahashi (director) talked about their approach to course design for the Switch entry. In order to make the courses as large as they did in Mario Golf: Super Rush, Camelot received technical advice from the Zelda: Breath of the Wild team.

Here’s Nintendo Everything’s translation of the excerpt:

Kazuya Mishima joined the Super Smash Bros. Ultimate lineup last month as the game’s penultimate downloadable fighter. In the latest issue of Famitsu, director Masahiro Sakurai talked through the team’s thought process when developing the character in his weekly column. They wanted to go beyond simply making the Tekken fighter fit the Smash Bros. mold, and find a way to represent Tekken and its core concepts in the game as well.

Below is out our full translation of the column, which also touches on Sakurai’s thoughts on fighting games compared to Smash Bros., where combos fit in the series, and more.

After more than three decades, Famicom Detective Club finally returned last month. Nintendo teamed up with Mages to produce brand new remakes. The Missing Heir as well as The Girl Who Stands Behind both made it to Switch – and in the west for the very first time.

Now that Famicom Detective Club is back after such a long period, could we see an entirely new game? Makoto Asada, who worked on the remakes as a producer, would at least be interested in making that happened.

In a recent interview with Yahoo Japan, Level-5 CEO Akihiko Hino spoke at length about the company’s beginnings, reminiscing about memorable moments in his career and sharing insight into the origin of some of the company’s most famous works. Once Hino announced his intent to get into self publishing back in the day, the pressure he faced fueled him to make the Level-5’s first self published title a hit, leading to the birth of Professor Layton.

We’ve translated Hino’s comments about self publishing, as well as the inspirations he borrowed from to create Professor Layton after the jump.

Level-5 has had a storied history with many iconic series on Nintendo systems, from the Professor Layton series to Inazuma Eleven among many others. One of the company’s earliest claims to fame however was Dragon Quest VIII.

In a recent interview with Yahoo Japan, Level-5 CEO Akihiko Hino detailed the events that led the company to developing a mainline entry in the iconic franchise. After expressing his disappointment with how certain aspects of Dragon Quest VII were handled, he was challenged by a producer to take on the project himself, leading to the development of one of the series’ most iconic entries.

We’ve translated Hino’s full comments after the jump.

Nintendo president Shuntaro Furukawa recently sat down with Nikkei to discuss his approach to leading the company through the current Switch era, as well as what influences past presidents like Satoru Iwata and Hiroshi Yamauchi had on him. He acknowledges that Iwata’s style is not something anybody can replicate but noted that even though he’s no longer with the company, Iwata’s influence remains at the company.

For Furukawa’s full comments, you can find Nintendo Everything’s full translation after the jump.

In a recent interview with Nikkei, Nintendo president Shuntaro Furukawa spoke candidly about his approach to running the company, speaking about influences from past presidents, his philosophy on hardware and more. As part of the interview, he also discussed Nintendo’s philosophy behind their IP and how the company views developing their characters.

Nintendo Everything’s full translation of the quote can be found after the jump.