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Shin Megami Tensei IV was announced for Europe during a Nintendo Direct over a year ago. Since then, we’ve barely heard a peep about the game’s release.

Despite the silence though, the 3DS RPG still seems to be planned for Europe. Nintendo France’s Stephan Bole told Le Figaro in a new interview that the company is “hard at work on the French translation of Shin Megami Tensei”.

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Super Smash Bros. for Wii U might be incorporating NFC functionality, new comments from Nintendo France general director Stephan Bole suggest. Bole told Le Figaro in an interview, “The NFC will be used in the Wii U version of Super Smash Bros.” While the interview is certainly trustworthy, we’ll need an official announcement before we can say this is confirmed.

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Siliconera has translated parts of Famitsu’s interview with the developers behind Hyrule Warriors. Supervisor Eiji Aonuma, producer Hisashi Koinuma, and producer Yosuke Hayashi discussed the game’s origins in-depth. You’ll find translations from the interview after the break.

Always Nintendo recently caught up with Comcept producer Nick Yu and game director Koji Imaeda to talk all things Mighty No. 9. The two commented on interest in taking advantage of the two screens offered on Wii U and 3DS, DLC, sequels, working with Nintendo, and more.

Check out those interview excerpts below:

On the Wii U/3DS’ dual screens and Miiverse…

Imaeda: Compared to other systems, the 3DS or Wii U run on two screens rather than one, and that is something I’d like us to make good use of. As for Miiverse, weeeell… I haven’t thought that one through yet. I’m sure we’ll think up a few ways of linking it with the game…

Nick: The project has only just made it out of the alpha stage, so we haven’t started working on the ports to each platform yet. That’s one of the steps we’ll be looking at from here on out. If we can get support for this from Nintendo it’s not out of the question, but for now we don’t have any plans.

On DLC plans…

Imaeda: Of course! We are crafting the game with the possibility of future DLC in mind. As for the type of DLC, we’re still trying to figure that out.

Nick: The cold reality you have to face as a producer is that Kickstarted projects come with a built-in ceiling where the budget is concerned. In other words, the amount of pledges you get during the KS campaign itself is all the budget you’re going to get. We don’t have the wiggle room to make any additional content that wasn’t promised during the campaign. However, we can get that wiggle room if the game ends up being a hit, and that’ll be a whole different story…

On possible Mighty No. 9 sequels…

Imaeda: Let’s not get ahead of ourselves! (laugh) First and foremost, we need to devote all of our time and energy into making the first game a success, so we don’t have the spare time to think about sequels! Although… the idea “if we do this in the first game, how about this or that for the second or third!” often comes up in discussions with the dev team. Everyone on the team definitely has what it takes, so I’d like to make sequels happen.

Nick: I’ve yet to meet a creator who doesn’t think about sequels! (laugh) Our Mighty No. 9 team is no exception. Depending on how well the game does, you might not only see sequels, but maybe spin-offs as well! Let’s do it, everyone!

On Comcept’s experience working with Nintendo…

Nick: It’s a little nerve-wrecking, but at the same time it’s quite an honor. I do think Nintendo has a knack for making hardware that offers unique ways to enjoy games. Making games for such systems is the ultimate creative challenge for creators, and a fun one at that. Given the opportunity, we’d love to make more games for them.

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ONM has published a new interview with former Rare staffer and Gory Detail founder Chris Seavor. Seavor discussed his background, the indie project The Unlikely Legend of Rusty Pup for Wii U/3DS, and voicing Slippy Toad.

You can find a few excerpts from the interview below. ONM’s full piece is located here.

The Mario Kart TV feature in Mario Kart 8 took quite a bit of work to implement, director Kosuke Yabuki told EDGE this month.

Highlight reels are determined by several factors like “the way the race develops, the way items are used, as well as changes in position.” To get things working properly, Yabuki said the development team “spent a lot of time to make it what it is.”

Mario Kart 8 automatically creates highlight reels based on a number of elements, including the way the race develops, the way items are used, as well as changes in position. It may look fairly simple, but we spent a lot of time to make it what it is. In two player multiplayer, the AI focuses on moments that show the relation between these two players… I think it creates a really nice, enjoyable video, even if it does look simple.

EDGE mentioned that Mario Kart 8’s YouTube uploading ability “suggests a change of thinking at Nintendo.” When asked why the company included this sharing feature, Yabuki responded:

When we were preparing the automatic highlight reel feature, we wanted users to share these videos with others, not just watch them by themselves. For example, after uploading a reel to YouTube, you can re-watch the highlights of your online battle the next day in your office, or at school or even on your smartphone. It will definitely encourage people to keep playing, and may be a great way to invite others to join you for a game.

Thanks to joclo for the tip.

MCV has published a few new comments from Nintendo UK’s Mario brand manager Roger Langford.

Langford first spoke generally about the racer, stating that it “really harnesses the capability of Wii U”.

“Mario Kart 8 really harnesses the capability of Wii U, it has HD graphics and runs at 60 frames per second constantly in single and multiplayer. There are lots of tweaks in the game that on the face of it might not sound like much. But we are looking to seed these bits out to the core Mario Kart fans via our online and social media campaign, and get that word-of-mouth and buzz up to launch. So that when we get to release day, we have the big TV campaign to make the big splash, but also the fans are raring to go.”

Langford also mentioned how Mario Kart in general tends to be one of Nintendo’s “killer titles” and each entry tends to take advantage of the company’s hardware.

“Mario Kart is one of our killer titles. Looking back at Super Mario Kart and then moving through the ages, you can see how integral Mario Kart is to Nintendo hardware. It always brings out the best in whatever hardware it is on. Super Mario Kart was one of the first two-player racing games out at the time. The N64 version was one of the first to allow four-player split-screen play. Then the DS version encouraged wireless download play, and Wii had its online functionality.”

From a commercial standpoint, Langford believes “that Mario Kart 8 can be the catalyst that will broaden Wii U’s horizons.”

“I certainly feel that Mario Kart 8 can be the catalyst that will broaden Wii U’s horizons. It’s very important for us that we have a successful launch and continue the promotion throughout the year and beyond.”

Last but not least, Langford spoke about Nintendo’s offer that provides consumers with an additional free Wii U title on the eShop with the purchase of Mario Kart 8.

“That offer lends itself perfectly to those people looking to buy into Wii U. You pick up the Mario Kart 8 bundle, and you can also download Wii Party U or Nintendo Land if you’re getting it for the family, or if you’re a Mario fan you can get New Super Mario Bros U. We also cater for more core gamers, as well, with Monster Hunter 3 and The Wonderful 101. We are offering that variety because Mario Kart 8 does attract such a broad demographic.”

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Here’s a little bit of trivia for you: all Mario Kart games are made from scratch. Nintendo doesn’t reuse its programming, assets, or other material across entries in the series.

We know this thanks to a Mario Kart 8 interview with director Kosuke Yabuki recently conducted by EDGE. The magazine mentioned that vehicles are easy to handle once acclimatized to, but wondered if Yabuki ever worried about the possibility of making the game less immediate.

He said in response:

Kosuke Yabuki has discussed Mario Kart 8’s usage of integrated YouTube support.

EDGE, speaking with the game’s director, asked what made the team decide to support sharing videos in this way, as it’s different to what we’ve seen from Nintendo in the past.

Yabuki told the magazine:

When we were preparing the automatic highlight reel feature, we wanted users to share these videos with others, not just watch them by themselves. For example, after uploading a reel to YouTube, you can re-watch the highlights of your online battle the next day in your office, or at school or even on your smartphone. It will definitely encourage people to keep playing, and may be a great way to invite others to join you for a game.

For those unaware, Mario Kart 8 allows players to watch and share highlights from their races. In addition to YouTube, videos can be shared on Miiverse.

Thanks to joclo for the tip.

Mario Kart 8 introduces a major change for Battle Mode. For the first time, tracks from the main game are used as opposed to dedicated arenas.

You might be wondering why Nintendo decided to implement such a drastic alteration for Battle Mode. Kosuke Yabuki, director of the title, did explain the thought process to EDGE this month.

Yabuki said the following when asked why the team replaced arenas with tracks:

We’ve changed the style of Battle mode for Mario Kart 8 to use circuits that lots of people can play on. Players won’t know when a rival will appear from around a corner, which will bring a new sense of excitement and strategy to this mode. In terms of rules, we designed it for playing with 12 players, including the CPU. In the beginning, you have to defeat the CPU players and earn your score, and towards the end it becomes a battle between just human players. That’s the real thrill of it! It should also be a fresh experience for users to be able to race backwards around the circuits they are familiar with. I’m sure there will be a few people who aren’t so sure about us moving away from how we’ve done things previously, but I hope they try it out for themselves first. I’m sure it will be a new experience for everyone, [and] like no other battles in Mario Kart before

Thanks to joclo for the tip.

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